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Getting Buy-in from Your Project Team on QCP

Certifying your interior architectural woodworking project with QCP streamlines the build, ensures a high degree of compliance, and protects you with unbeatable risk assurance. But even though you understand the benefits of QCP, they might not be so clear to your project team. So when they reject QCP or target it for removal to cut costs, it’s important that you’re prepared to win them over. (more...)

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The Importance of Cabinet Shop Drawings in QCP Projects

As well as raising the final quality of wood casework and millwork, QCP is designed to streamline the architect’s design process. Rather than hyper specify in their architecture drawings, they can highlight certain AWI Standards that the woodworker should follow. This saves a great deal of time and the use of a common universal language makes their designs much easier to interpret. But just bec (more...)

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How to Care for and Store Materials for an Architectural Woodworking Project

While fixing non-conformities in architectural woodwork during fabrication or installation adds time and money to a project, it’s possible to bring the products up to the expected standard. But warping and excessive dimension change caused by poor storage and care of materials can ruin products no matter how skillfully they’re assembled. That means meeting the proper architectural standard of (more...)

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How to Get Top-Quality Woodwork When You Outsource

Some architects prefer to keep specification writing in-house. But when you have a pressing workload or need an outside perspective on a complex project, you might choose to hire an independent spec writer. This can be an excellent way to add additional value to your project, and go above and beyond your client’s expectations. While an architect needs to fulfill many roles, the niche expertise (more...)

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3 Most Common Errors in Architects’ Specifications

For an interior architectural woodworking project to be certified by AWI-QCP, certain steps need to be taken during the specification phase. Architects who have completed this process even once or twice find it smooth and intuitive. But we see a few common errors crop up for architects who are new to including QCP in their project specifications. While most mistakes won’t have a significant imp (more...)

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How to Determine if a Contractor is QCP-Licensed

Your success in the construction industry is defined by your reputation. When you become known for accurately estimating projects and delivering outstanding results on time, you’re much more likely to receive repeat business from satisfied clients. To ensure the highest quality of craftsmanship and materials in interior architectural woodworking, many architects certify their projects through t (more...)

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Benefits of Project Registration for QCP Licensees

If you hold one of AWI-QCP’s 35 architectural woodworking licenses, you’ve proven that your firm’s knowledge and skills are among the best in the industry. Add to that your extensive experience in AWI Standards, project estimation, materials sourcing, and more, and any hiring architect can have total faith in your capabilities. But even though your QCP license affirms your superior talents, (more...)

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How QCP can be the Difference between Woodworking Project Success and Failure

For a QCP-licensed woodworking firm, the value their qualification adds to any interior architectural woodworking project is obvious. But for the architects and general contractors who hire them, it can be hard to see how certifying a project through QCP significantly changes the outcome. As such, they might be persuaded by an unqualified firm to cut corners and remove QCP from their specification (more...)

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What’s the Difference Between Architectural Woodwork and Casework?

For interior architectural woodworkers, recognizing and understanding the wide range of woodworking terminology soon becomes second nature. But for the architects, general contractors, and new recruits who work with them, it can be tough to discern the difference between certain terms. Take cabinetry, for example. To refer to this as either interior architectural woodwork or as casework would be (more...)

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